Andaman & Nicobar | Andhra Pradesh | Arunachal Pradesh | Assam | Bihar | Chandigarh | Chhattisgarh | Daman & Diu | Dadra & Nagar Haveli | Goa  | Delhi | Gujrat | Haryana | Himachel Pradesh | Jharkhand | Karnataka | Kerala | Lakshadweep | Madhya Pradesh | Maharashtra | Manipur | Meghalaya | Mizoram | Nagaland | Odisha | Puducherry | Punjab | Rajasthan | Sikkim | TamilNadu | Telangana | Tripura | UttarPradesh | Uttarakhand | WestBengal


100 smart cities of Modi

About  PM Narendra Modi's 100 Indian Smart Cities:

The Centre has prepared a blueprint to define the key elements of the 100 indian smart cities it plans to establish across the nation. The smart cities were one of the main promises made by Prime Minister Narendra Modi in the run-up to the Lok Sabha elections earlier this year.

The government has allocated Rs.1000 crore for each smart cities which will be selected according to its population. Eight indian smart cities with more than four million people have been identified and they will have a satellite smart city.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Thursday launched the Smart Cities Mission. Under the Smart Cities Mission, 100 new indian smart cities, which would promote adoption of smart solutions for efficient use of available assets and enhance the quality of urban life, would be made.
He also launched the Atal Mission for Rejuvenation and Urban Transformation (AMRUT), Smart Cities Mission, and Housing for All (Urban).
He said private property developers should not decide how a smat cities should grow and the decision should be taken by residents and the smart cities leadership, as he unveiled three mega flagship urban schemes aimed at developing smart cities as engines of growth.5 key elements of PM Narendra Modi's 100 indian smart cities:

We highlight the 10 key points from PM Narendra Modi’s speech at the Smart Cities Mission launch:
* Urbanisation should be viewed as an opportunity and urban centres should be viewed as growth engines
* India is rapidly urbanising. Every year Hindustan gives birth to a small country
* Smart Cities will be selected through a competition among cities while 500 cities are being identified under AMRUT.* For the first time in India, a challenge was being floated, in which the citizens of urban India could contribute in the formulation of development visions of their cities. This competitive mechanism would end the top-down approach, and lead to people-centric urban development.
* These urban development schemes were not prepared by the Government alone, but involved perhaps the biggest consultation exercise ever taken by the Union Government, involving all stakeholders and examining global best practices.
* There is a lack of holistic vision about urban planning, and expansion is driven not by the administrators of a city, but by property developers.
* Through AMRUT, the aim of the Government is to give cities themselves the chance to plan their future growth
* There should be facility for walk-to-work because today a person spends maximum time in travelling to office and gets very little time to work
* A house was a turning point in the lives of poor, which leads towards a better life and the government’s effort was to not just provide a house, but to provide the right environment to live life to the fullest.”
* Citing the existing housing shortage of 2 crore units, he said India would complete 75 years of Independence in 2022, and by then, it was “our responsibility to provide a house for everyone.
* The country’s 40 per cent population lives in cities and it is the responsibility of the government to uplift their standards of life. We cannot leave them on their fate

 

SMART CITIES - TRANSFORMING LIFE - TRANSFORMING INDIA:

As the global population continues to grow at a steady pace, more and more people are moving to cities every single day. Experts predict the worlds urban population will double by 2050 which means we are adding the equivalent of seven New Delhi Cities to the planet every single year. Urban areas also contribute a higher share of GDP. In India, the urban population is currently 31% of the total population and it contributes over 60% of India's GDP. It is projected that urban India will contribute nearly 75% of the national GDP in the next 15 years. Smart Cities are accordingly referred to as the engines of economic growth. There is accordingly a crying need for the cities to get smarter to handle this large-scale urbanization and finding new ways to manage complexity, increase efficiency, reduce expenses, and improve quality of life.


The key features of a Smart Cities is in the intersect between competitiveness, Capital and Sustainability. The smart cities should be able to provide good infrastructure such as water, sanitation, reliable utility services, health care; attract investments; transparent processes that make it easy to run a commercial activities; simple and on line processes for obtaining approvals, and various citizen centric services to make citizens feel safe and happy.

WHY SMART CITIES?

Throughout the world, and especially in India, rapid population increase and the development of economic activity are driving accelerating growth in resource consumption, giving urgency to the issue of natural resource depletion. The global environmental changes and people's lifestyle changes are prompting action for creation of smart cities.

SMART CITY PERSPECTIVE

"Smart cities use information and communication technologies (ICT) to be more intelligent and efficient in the use of resources, resulting

in cost and energy savings, improved service delivery and quality of life and reduced environmental footprint all while supporting innovation and the low carbon economy." - Boyd Cohen

 

"Realistically, cities must start small. No one has the resources to redo an entire metropolitan area. But we can have the best of both worlds as long as we are willing to do a bit of planning. The key is to start with an overall roadmap, one that specifies an interoperable enterprise architecture. That way we can build small, individual projects with the assurance that when the time is right they will plug together seamlessly. Yes, we should start small. But only after we think big." - Jesse Berst/Smart Cities Council

 

LIST OF 100 SMART CITIES IN INDIA

S.No.

Name of State/UT

No. of cities shortlisted

Names of the Indian Smart Cities

1.

Andaman & Nicobar Islands

1

1. Port Blair

2.

Andhra Pradesh

3

1. Visakhapatnam

2. Tirupati

3. Kakinada

3.

Arunachal Pradesh

1

1. Pasighat

4.

Assam

1

1. Guwahati

5.

Bihar

3

1. Muzaffarpur

2. Bhagalpur

3. Biharsharif

6.

Chandigarh

1

1. Chandigarh

7.

Chhattisgarh

2

1. Raipur

2. Bilaspur

8.

Daman & Diu

1

1. Diu

9.

Dadra & Nagar Haveli

1

1. Silvassa

10.

Delhi

1

1. New Delhi Municipal Council

11.

Goa

1

1. Panaji

12.

Gujarat

6

1. Gandhinagar

2. Ahmedabad

3. Surat

4. Vadodara

5. Rajkot

6. Dahod

13.

Haryana

2

1. Karnal

2. Faridabad

14.

Himachal Pradesh

1

1. Dharamshala

15.

Jharkhand

1

1. Ranchi

16.

Karnataka

6

1. Mangaluru

2. Belagavi

3. Shivamogga

4. Hubballi - Dharwad

5. Tumakuru

6. Davanegere

17.

Kerala

1

1. Kochi

18.

Lakshadweep

1

1. Kavaratti

19.

Madhya Pradesh

7

1. Bhopal

 

 

 

2. Indore

 

 

 

3. Gwalior

 

 

 

4. Jabalpur

 

 

 

5. Satna

 

 

 

6. Ujjain

 

 

 

7. Sagar

20.

Maharashtra

10

1. Navi Mumbai

 

 

 

2. Nashik

 

 

 

3. Thane

 

 

 

4. Greater Mumbai

 

 

 

5. Amravati

 

 

 

6. Solapur

 

 

 

7. Nagpur

 

 

 

8. Pune

 

 

 

9. Kalyan - Dombivali

 

 

 

10. Aurangabad

21.

Manipur

1

1. Imphal

22.

Meghalaya

1

1. Shillong

23.

Mizoram

1

1. Aizawl

24.

Nagaland

1

1. Kohima

25.

Odisha

2

1. Bhubabeshwar

 

 

 

2. Raurkela

26.

Puducherry

1

1. Oulgaret

27.

Punjab

3

1. Ludhiana   

 

 

 

2. Jalandhar

 

 

 

3. Amritsar

28.

Rajasthan

4

1. Jaipur

 

 

 

2. Udaipur

 

 

 

3. Kota

 

 

 

4. Ajmer

18.

Lakshadweep

1

1. Kavaratti

19.

Madhya Pradesh

7

1. Bhopal

 

 

 

2. Indore

 

 

 

3. Gwalior

 

 

 

4. Jabalpur

 

 

 

5. Satna

 

 

 

6. Ujjain

 

 

 

7. Sagar

20.

Maharashtra

10

1. Navi Mumbai

 

 

 

2. Nashik

 

 

 

3. Thane

 

 

 

4. Greater Mumbai

 

 

 

5. Amravati

 

 

 

6. Solapur

 

 

 

7. Nagpur

 

 

 

8. Pune

 

 

 

9. Kalyan - Dombivali

 

 

 

10. Aurangabad

21.

Manipur

1

1. Imphal

22.

Meghalaya

1

1. Shillong

23.

Mizoram

1

1. Aizawl

24.

Nagaland

1

1. Kohima

25.

Odisha

2

1. Bhubabeshwar

 

 

 

2. Raurkela

26.

Puducherry

1

1. Oulgaret

27.

Punjab

3

1. Ludhiana   

 

 

 

2. Jalandhar

 

 

 

3. Amritsar

28.

Rajasthan

4

1. Jaipur

 

 

 

2. Udaipur

 

 

 

3. Kota

 

 

 

4. Ajmer

29.

Sikkim

1

1. Namchi

30.

Tamil Nadu

12

1. Tiruchirapalli

 

 

 

2. Tirunelveli   

 

 

 

3. Dindigul

 

 

 

4. Thanjavur

 

 

 

5. Tiruppur

 

 

 

6. Salem

 

 

 

7. Vellore

 

 

 

8. Coimbatore

 

 

 

9. Madurai

 

 

 

10. Erode

 

 

 

11. Thoothukudi   

 

 

 

12. Chennai

31.

Telangana

2

1. Greater Hyderabad

 

 

 

1. Greater Warangal

32.

Tripura

1

1. Agartala

33.

Uttar Pradesh

12

1. Moradabad

 

 

 

2. Aligarh

 

 

 

3. Saharanpur

 

 

 

4. Bareilly

 

 

 

5. Jhansi

 

 

 

6. Kanpur

 

 

 

7. Allahabad

 

 

 

8. Lucknow

 

 

 

9. Varanasi

 

 

 

10. Ghaziabad

 

 

 

11. Agra

 

 

 

12. Rampur

34.

Uttarakhand

1

1. Dehradun

35.

West Bengal

4

1. New Town Kolkata

 

 

 

2. Bidhannagar   

 

 

 

3. Durgapur

 

 

 

4. Haldi

What makes a city smart?

While there's no single definition of a "smart" city, the term generally refers to cities using information technology to solve urban problems.
Think of sensors monitoring water levels, energy usage, traffic flows, and security cameras, and sending that data directly to city administrators. Or apps that help residents navigate traffic, report potholes and vote. Or trash collection that's totally automated.
Older cities can be retrofitted with smart city technologies, but smart cities are also built from scratch. Because new cities have every detail planned from the outset, they allow urban officials to address problems like overcrowding or pollution before the first residents move in.
"We can already anticipate the problems that these cities face and attack them at the source," said Rahul Sharma, an executive at IBM, which sees smart city technology as a major new market. "India has a fantastic opportunity where we can work outside of the shackles of existing technology."
India isn't the only country jumping on the smart cities bandwagon. New cities are popping up in countries like South Korea, the United Arab Emirates, and China, which announced an $8 billion investment fund in smart city technology this year.

Smart City Features

Some typical features of comprehensive development in Smart Cities are described below.
i. Promoting mixed land use in area based developments–planning for ‘unplanned areas’ containing a range of compatible activities and land uses close to one another in order to make land use more efficient. The States will enable some flexibility in land use and building bye-laws to adapt to change;
ii. Housing and inclusiveness - expand housing opportunities for all;
iii. Creating walkable localities –reduce congestion, air pollution and resource depletion, boost local economy, promote interactions and ensure security. The road network is created or refurbished not only for vehicles and public transport, but also for pedestrians and cyclists, and necessary administrative services are offered within walking or cycling distance;
iv. Preserving and developing open spaces - parks, playgrounds, and recreational spaces in order to enhance the quality of life of citizens, reduce the urban heat effects in Areas and generally promote eco-balance;
v. Promoting a variety of transport options - Transit Oriented Development (TOD), public transport and last mile para-transport connectivity;
vi. Making governance citizen-friendly and cost effective - increasingly rely on online services to bring about accountability and transparency, especially using mobiles to reduce cost of services and providing services without having to go to municipal offices. Forming e-groups to listen to people and obtain feedback and use online monitoring of programs and activities with the aid of cyber tour of worksites;
vii. Giving an identity to the city - based on its main economic activity, such as local cuisine, health, education, arts and craft, culture, sports goods, furniture, hosiery, textile, dairy, etc;
viii. Applying Smart Solutions to infrastructure and services in area-based development in order to make them better. For example, making Areas less vulnerable to disasters, using fewer resources, and providing cheaper services.

Accordingly, the purpose of the Smart Cities Mission is to drive economic growth and improve the quality of life of people by enabling local area development and harnessing technology, especially technology that leads to Smart outcomes. Area- based development will transform existing areas (retrofit and redevelop), including slums, into better planned ones, thereby improving liveability of the whole City. New areas (greenfield) will be developed around cities in order to accommodate the expanding population in urban areas. Application of Smart Solutions will enable cities to use technology, information and data to improve infrastructure and services. Comprehensive development in this way will improve quality of life, create employment and enhance incomes for all, especially the poor and the disadvantaged, leading to inclusive Cities.

Strategy

The strategic components of area-based development in the Smart Cities Mission are city improvement (retrofitting), city renewal (redevelopment) and city extension (greenfield development) plus a Pan-city initiative in which Smart Solutions are applied covering larger parts of the city. Below are given the descriptions of the three models of Area-based smart city development:

1.1 Retrofitting will introduce planning in an existing built-up area to achieve smart city objectives, along with other objectives, to make the existing area more efficient and liveable. In retrofitting, an area consisting of more than 500 acres will be identified by the city in consultation with citizens. Depending on the existing level of infrastructure services in the identified area and the vision of the residents, the cities will prepare a strategy to become smart. Since existing structures are largely to remain intact in this model, it is expected that more intensive infrastructure service levels and a large number of smart applications will be packed into the retrofitted smart city. This strategy may also be completed in a shorter time frame, leading to its replication in another part of the city.

 1.2 Redevelopment will effect a replacement of the existing built-up environment and enable co-creation of a new layout with enhanced infrastructure using mixed land use and increased density. Redevelopment envisages an area of more than 50 acres, identified by Urban Local Bodies (ULBs) in consultation with citizens. For instance, a new layout plan of the identified area will be prepared with mixed land-use, higher FSI and high ground coverage. Two examples of the redevelopment model are the Saifee Burhani Upliftment Project in Mumbai (also called the Bhendi Bazaar Project) and the redevelopment of East Kidwai Nagar in New Delhi being undertaken by the National Building Construction Corporation.

1.3 Greenfield development will introduce most of the Smart Solutions in a previously vacant area (more than 250 acres) using innovative planning, plan financing and plan implementation tools (e.g. land pooling/ land reconstitution) with provision for affordable housing, especially for the poor. Greenfield developments are required around cities in order to address the needs of the expanding population. One well known example is the GIFT City in Gujarat. Unlike retrofitting and redevelopment, greenfield developments could be located either within the limits of the ULB or within the limits of the local Urban Development Authority (UDA).

1.4 Pan-city development envisages application of selected Smart Solutions to the existing city-wide infrastructure. Application of Smart Solutions will involve the use of technology, information and data to make infrastructure and services better. For example, applying Smart Solutions in the transport sector (intelligent traffic management system) and reducing average commute time or cost of citizens will have positive effects on productivity and quality of life of citizens. Another example can be waste water recycling and smart metering which can make a huge contribution to better water management in the city.  

The smart city proposal of each shortlisted city is expected to encapsulate either a retrofitting or redevelopment or greenfield development model, or a mix thereof and a Pan-city feature with Smart Solution(s). It is important to note that pan-city is an additional feature to be provided. Since smart city is taking a compact area approach, it is necessary that all the city residents feel there is something in it for them also. Therefore, the additional requirement of some (at least one) city-wide smart solution has been put in the scheme to make it inclusive. For North Eastern and Himalayan States, the area proposed to be developed will be one-half of what is prescribed for any of the alternative models - retrofitting, redevelopment or greenfield development.